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ICCO welcomes refreshed Barcelona Principles

ICCO has welcomed the revised Barcelona Principles, following their launch by AMEC this morning in London.

The announcement of the Barcelona Principles 2.0 can be read here.

Francis Ingham MPRCA, PRCA Director General and ICCO Chief Executive said:

“These refreshed Barcelona principles are the latest significant step in the professionalisation of the PR industry.

“I’m proud of the role played by PRCA and ICCO members in 31 countries around the world, helping AMEC in its work.

“We will be planning evaluation at the heart of our work, not least via the ICCO summit in Milan next month.

“The industry needs to embrace measurement and evaluation if it is to continue growing in size and relevance. These new principles will be a fantastic help in doing so.”

 

About ICCO

The International Communications Consultancy Organisation (ICCO) is the voice of public relations consultancies around the world. The ICCO membership comprises national trade associations in 31 countries across the globe in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australasia. Collectively, these associations represent over 2,000 PR firms. www.iccopr.com

Contact: ICCO General Manager, Binta Kristin Hammerich

binta.hammerich@iccopr.com

+44 (0) 2072336026

PRCA National Conference 2015

Harris Diamond, CEO of McCann Worldgroup; Kamal Ahmed, BBC Business Editor; and Andrew McGuinness MPRCA, Freuds CEO. Curated and introduced by Golin International President and PRCA Chairman Matt Neale MPRCA, the conference will shine a light on the future of the industry, for both agency and in-house practitioners. AGENDA

09:00 REGISTRATION
09:30 Welcome Address: Matt Neale MPRCA, President, Golin and PRCA Chairman; and Francis Ingham MPRCA, PRCA Director General
PART ONE:  EVOLVING AT INTEGRATED OFFERING
09:45 Kamal Ahmed, Business Editor, BBC
10:15 Harris Diamond, CEO, McCann Worldgroup: ‘The future role for PR within the broader marketing services world’
10:45 Jackie Brock Doyle MPRCA, Chairman, Good Relations: ‘Integrated by default: lessons from the field of play’
11:15 COFFEE BREAK
PART TWO: THE ECONOMICS OF REPUTATION
11:35 Shane O’Riordain, MD, Communication, Strategy, Regulation and Pricing, Royal Mail: ‘Guilty until proven innocent: How to defend and build your brand in 2015?’
12:05 Tony Langham CMPRCA, Chief Executive of Lansons, chairs ‘The Economics of Reputation: conversation starters and panel debate’ featuring: – Miles Celic, Director of Group Strategic Communications, Prudential plc – Mary Whenman, Former Managing Director, Corporate, Financial & Public Affairs, Weber Shandwick & President, Women in PR
12:50 LUNCH
13:50 Andrew McGuinness MPRCA, CEO, Freuds: ‘Why corporates must be famous for good: the future of successful reputation is in being famous for your positive impact’
PART THREE: THE SCIENCE OF PR
14:20 Toby Harrison, Planning Partner, Adam and Eve DDB: ‘The Science of PR’
15:05 Imogen Osborne MPRCA, Question and Retain, presents ‘How real-time data is delivering growth and innovation for PR consultancies’, featuringNeil Kleiner MPRCA, Head of Social Media, Golin, on real time marketing
15:50 COFFEE BREAK
PART FOUR: SUMMING UP AND BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER…
16:10 Danny Rogers FPRCA, Editor-in-Chief of PRWeek and author of Campaigns that Shook the World: ‘A new manifesto for the outstanding PR campaigns of today and the future’
16:40 Michael Frohlich MPRCA, CEO, Ogilvy PR, and Carla Busazi, Chief Content Officer, WGSN: ‘Listen to many, speak to a few’
17:10  Closing speech: Matt Neale MPRCA, President, Golin and PRCA Chairman
Special thanks to our media partner: Special thanks to the sponsors:

PRCA National Conference 2015

Taking place at BAFTA, 195 Piccadilly, in Central London on 25th September 2015, the event will see presentations from Harris Diamond, CEO of McCann Worldgroup; Kamal Ahmed, BBC Business Editor; and Andrew McGuinness MPRCA, Freuds CEO.

Curated and introduced by Golin International President and PRCA Chairman Matt Neale MPRCA, the conference will shine a light on the future of the industry, for both agency and in-house practitioners.

AGENDA

09:00 REGISTRATION
09:30 Welcome Address: Matt Neale MPRCA, President, Golin and PRCA Chairman; and Francis Ingham MPRCA, PRCA Director General
PART ONE:  EVOLVING AT INTEGRATED OFFERING
09:45 Kamal Ahmed, Business Editor, BBC
10:15 Harris Diamond, CEO, McCann Worldgroup: ‘The future role for PR within the broader marketing services world’
10:45 Jackie Brock Doyle MPRCA, Chairman, Good Relations: ‘Integrated by default: lessons from the field of play’
11:15 COFFEE BREAK
PART TWO: THE ECONOMICS OF REPUTATION
11:35 Shane O’Riordain, MD, Communication, Strategy, Regulation and Pricing, Royal Mail: ‘Guilty until proven innocent: How to defend and build your brand in 2015?’
12:05 Tony Langham CMPRCA, Chief Executive of Lansons, chairs ‘The Economics of Reputation: conversation starters and panel debate’ featuring:
– Miles Celic, Director of Group Strategic Communications, Prudential plc
– Mary Whenman, Former Managing Director, Corporate, Financial & Public Affairs, Weber Shandwick & President, Women in PR
12:50 LUNCH
13:50 Andrew McGuinness MPRCA, CEO, Freuds: ‘Why corporates must be famous for good: the future of successful reputation is in being famous for your positive impact’
PART THREE: THE SCIENCE OF PR
14:20 Toby Harrison, Planning Partner, Adam and Eve DDB: ‘The Science of PR’
15:05 Imogen Osborne MPRCA, Question and Retain, presents ‘How real-time data is delivering growth and innovation for PR consultancies’, featuringNeil Kleiner MPRCA, Head of Social Media, Golin, on real time marketing
15:50 COFFEE BREAK
PART FOUR: SUMMING UP AND BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER…
16:10 Danny Rogers FPRCA, Editor-in-Chief of PRWeek and author of Campaigns that Shook the World:
‘A new manifesto for the outstanding PR campaigns of today and the future’
16:40 Michael Frohlich MPRCA, CEO, Ogilvy PR, and Carla Busazi, Chief Content Officer, WGSN: ‘Listen to many, speak to a few’
17:10  Closing speech: Matt Neale MPRCA, President, Golin and PRCA Chairman

Special thanks to our media partner:

Special thanks to the sponsors:

Launch of Barcelona Principles 2.0

ONLY register if you intend to attend the event in person. Five years ago the Barcelona Principles emerged out of the AMEC International Summit in Barcelona as the first framework for PR and communications measurement. During the summer an international working group has revised the Barcelona Principles to reflect the changes in communications since 2010. David Rockland, the Ketchum Partner who led the original discussion which evolved the Barcelona Principles at the AMEC Summit in Spain in 2010 and who chaired an international working group to discuss the changes, will explain the new-look Principles at the event in London. The event will be streamed to other parts of the world. The Barcelona Principles working group included the original partners involved in the Barcelona Principles of 2010: – AMEC, ICCO, Institute for Public Relations, PRCA, PRSA and The Global Alliance.

  • You will hear how the 7 original Barcelona Principles have been refreshed to reflect current communications practice.
  • How the updated Barcelona Principles provide more guidance on “what to do” in order to incorporate the expanding media landscape into a transparent, reliable, and consistent measurement and evaluation framework.
Due to anticipated high demand, please book your place now.   Timetable:
08.30 Registration, tea/coffee and networking
09.00 Welcome and background Barry Leggetter, CEO, AMEC – the International Association for Measurement and Evaluation of Communication
09.05 David Rockland, Ketchum Partner, Immediate Past Chairman, AMEC and Chair of the Barcelona Principles Working Group
09.25 Jeremy Thompson, Managing Director, EMEA – Gorkana, a Cision Company & AMEC Chairman
09.30-10.00 Q&A
         

Launch of Barcelona Principles 2.0

ONLY register if you intend to attend the event in person.

Five years ago the Barcelona Principles emerged out of the AMEC International Summit in Barcelona as the first framework for PR and communications measurement.

During the summer an international working group has revised the Barcelona Principles to reflect the changes in communications since 2010.

David Rockland, the Ketchum Partner who led the original discussion which evolved the Barcelona Principles at the AMEC Summit in Spain in 2010 and who chaired an international working group to discuss the changes, will explain the new-look Principles at the event in London. The event will be streamed to other parts of the world.

The Barcelona Principles working group included the original partners involved in the Barcelona Principles of 2010: – AMEC, ICCO, Institute for Public Relations, PRCA, PRSA and The Global Alliance.

  • You will hear how the 7 original Barcelona Principles have been refreshed to reflect current communications practice.
  • How the updated Barcelona Principles provide more guidance on “what to do” in order to incorporate the expanding media landscape into a transparent, reliable, and consistent measurement and evaluation framework.

Due to anticipated high demand, please book your place now.

 

Timetable:

08.30 Registration, tea/coffee and networking
09.00 Welcome and background
Barry Leggetter, CEO, AMEC – the International Association for Measurement and Evaluation of Communication
09.05 David Rockland, Ketchum Partner, Immediate Past Chairman, AMEC and Chair of the Barcelona Principles Working Group
09.25 Jeremy Thompson, Managing Director, EMEA – Gorkana, a Cision Company & AMEC Chairman
09.30-10.00 Q&A

 

       

10 words that weaken your message

Written by – Lorraine Forest-Turner, PRCA trainer 

What message do we convey when we say or write “I’m just checking if Friday’s meeting is still on” or “this is just an example of our creative work”?

‘Just’ has become the new ‘basically’, the word many of us habitually use without even realising it.

While ‘basically’ adds nothing, but doesn’t necessarily harm our communications, ‘just’ weakens our words by trivialising the thing that follows it.

Remove ‘just’ from the phrases above and see how much more important the meeting and the creative work sound without it.

Pruning out the weak words

Any good editor will glance at a piece of writing and remove weak and unnecessary words.

So what are the biggest culprits? Which words should we banish from our communications? Or at least use cautiously.

Just

Use ‘just’ when you want to convey something happened in that moment, when you mean ‘merely’ or when referring to fairness and justice.

  • He had just hid the evidence when the police arrived.
  • He had just enough time to hide the evidence before the police arrived.
  • Based on the evidence presented at the trial, the judge made a just decision.

That

You’d be surprised how often you can eliminate ‘that’ from a sentence. Read the following sentences out loud, first with ‘that’ and then without it. Which sound better?

  • The Government believes that Universal Credit will make it easier for people to move into work.
  • Please let us know if there’s any information that you feel we should take into account.
  • He was on holiday at the time that the decision was made.

Of

Like ‘that’, when used correctly, we’d be lost without ‘of’. However there are numerous times when ‘of’ can be eliminated. Each of the following can lose ‘of’ (or phrases containing ‘of’) without affecting the meaning. (No, you can’t lose ‘of’ from that last sentence. And you can’t lose ‘that’ from that one. But you can get stuck in a loop if you continue in this vein.)

  • He threw the evidence out of the window.
  • We’re in receipt of your letter. (We’ve received your letter.)
  • She made a total of £86 at the car boot sale. (She made £86 at the car boot sale.)

Think/feel/believe

These words are often used to soften harsh messages or express an unpopular opinion. However they can weaken your message by implying what you’re saying isn’t factually true. Read them with and without the opinions and see how they weaken and strengthen the message.

  • I think John isn’t up to the job.
  • I feel the campaign would be more effective in December.
  • I believe we’ve made the right decision.

Really/very/absolutely/completely

Too many qualifiers in your speech/writing can make you sound unclear or less knowledgeable. We tend to rely on words such as ‘really’, ‘very’, ‘absolutely’ and ‘completely’ when we don’t know (or can’t be bothered finding) a more appropriate word.

  • He’s really good at singing. (He has a three octave range.)
  • The system is very fast. (The system downloads data at 100 mbps.)
  • You’ve absolutely ruined the design. (You’ve used five different fonts on one page.)

Once you start eliminating these unnecessary words from your communications, you should notice people paying more attention to what you say.

Here are a few more to watch out for/use sparingly:

  • Basically
  • Essentially
  • Generally
  • Kind of
  • Mostly
  • Pretty
  • Quite
  • Rather
  • Slightly
  • Somewhat
  • Sort of
  • Various
  • Virtually

Lorraine Forest-Turner, a PRCA trainer, takes on the PRCA “Writing effective press releases and “Honing your Copywriting skills” training courses.

If Cannes is an indicator, the future belongs to PR

Written by- Francis Ingham

500_francisingham2Print@PRCAIngham

PR’s reputation on La Croisette is growing, so now it’s time we took on the ad agencies.

No word carries such mystique in the PR world as ‘Cannes’. It conjures images of rosé wine; helicopters from Nice; yachts; topless sunbathing; and random celebs making tangential points about the merits of their clients’ products. And like all great myths, that parody contains some truth.

But having been here with ICCO for the second year, I also know Cannes is so much more than that. Sure, the location is meant to entice. There are plenty of advertising execs. And Kim Kardashian had a moment when her yacht wouldn’t fit into Cannes harbour for her to convey the groundbreaking observation of ‘maybe I tweet too many selfies in a bikini’. But Cannes does represent and celebrate the extraordinary creativity of the PR industry. So, what lessons did I draw?

– PR is flourishing. Our industry won many more awards this time. MSL should be proud of its #LikeAGirl campaign – pride confirmed in victory.

– PR is here in greater numbers than ever – I bumped into dozens of agency heads, many here for the first time.

– PR is truly international. Judging by the Cannes badges, this year there were many more countries there.

– PR’s future is assured. ICCO ran and made possible the Young Lions programme, celebrating young PR. And the ideas generated were astonishing in their breadth and sophistication.

– PR is growing globally. We like to think of the UK and US as world leaders – they are. But the Young Lions’ gold went to Sweden. The silver and bronze to Columbia and China respectively.

But the main point is this – PR represents the future; advertising the past. When PR first came to Cannes it was the poor relation. Poor in numbers; weak in submission content; disappointed in such a small number of wins. Today? It’s the thrusting, entrepreneurial member of the family, with the best ideas. Winning more business. Looked on with envy by – yes – its more cumbersome, less imaginative relations in advertising.

Of course, not everything is rosé (get it?). Too many people think they can’t win here, so they don’t enter. Our production values and the presentation of our content still need to improve. And we need to grab some of that advertising industry arrogance – the confidence to bid for big budgets and then spend them. In a straight fight, advertising still plans a little better; does creativity a little better. And yet…

The key attributes the judges looked for were excellence in campaign design and delivery. And the ability to link commercial purpose with wider social change. I’ve no doubt that those metrics are ones on which PR can happily base its future.

The agency bosses I met this week recognised the challenges, but were incredibly positive about addressing them. They were proud to represent their industry, and optimistic about its future. Representing the PRCA, now the UK’s biggest professional body, and ICCO, the largest international one, I felt the same. If Cannes is anything to go by, the future belongs to PR.

Original article from PRWeek

Francis Ingham’s postcard from Cannes

Written by Francis Ingham

500_francisingham2Print@PRCAIngham

 

So it’s all over bar the boasting, the excuses, and the analysis. And maybe the odd hangover. Cannes has presented its awards, and agency heads are left to work out what if means for them and what it means for the industry

What are my observations?

First, the number of PR practitioners here keeps on growing. Partly because more agencies are entering and partly because PR people simply feel more at home here.

There are more PR wins. MSL walked away happy last night. But so did plenty of other PR agencies. The old lament of ‘PR agencies don’t/can’t win at Cannes’ simply doesn’t hold true any longer. But equally….

Lines really are blurred now. OK. That’s not an original observation. But it’s blindingly obvious when you’re here and when you see the work on display. Is this a bad thing? No. For the simple reason that PR agencies are better placed to eat into rivals (previously larger) territories than they are to eat into ours.

The campaigns that won were the integrated ones that told a compelling story. And more often than not spoke to a higher purpose than just profit or just fulfilling a brief. And yes, #likeagirl ticks all of those boxes.

And finally, the future really is bright. ICCO sponsored and made possible the Young Lions. Bigger than last year, and attracting entries from 18 countries, it was a fantastic showcase of the industry’s future. And showed, incidentally, that for all that the UK and the USA are the most advanced markets, our two countries have no monopoly on talent. The winning team came from Sweden. Last year, It came from Japan.

And on that note go and open up the ICCO House of PR. There are a lot of sore heads to tend to this morning…..

Francis Ingham's postcard from Cannes

500_francisingham2Print@PRCAIngham   So it’s all over bar the boasting, the excuses, and the analysis. And maybe the odd hangover. Cannes has presented its awards, and agency heads are left to work out what if means for them and what it means for the industry What are my observations? First, the number of PR practitioners here keeps on growing. Partly because more agencies are entering and partly because PR people simply feel more at home here. There are more PR wins. MSL walked away happy last night. But so did plenty of other PR agencies. The old lament of ‘PR agencies don’t/can’t win at Cannes’ simply doesn’t hold true any longer. But equally…. Lines really are blurred now. OK. That’s not an original observation. But it’s blindingly obvious when you’re here and when you see the work on display. Is this a bad thing? No. For the simple reason that PR agencies are better placed to eat into rivals (previously larger) territories than they are to eat into ours. The campaigns that won were the integrated ones that told a compelling story. And more often than not spoke to a higher purpose than just profit or just fulfilling a brief. And yes, #likeagirl ticks all of those boxes. And finally, the future really is bright. ICCO sponsored and made possible the Young Lions. Bigger than last year, and attracting entries from 18 countries, it was a fantastic showcase of the industry’s future. And showed, incidentally, that for all that the UK and the USA are the most advanced markets, our two countries have no monopoly on talent. The winning team came from Sweden. Last year, It came from Japan. And on that note go and open up the ICCO House of PR. There are a lot of sore heads to tend to this morning…..

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